AskDefine | Define fond

Dictionary Definition

fond adj
1 having or displaying warmth or affection; "affectionate children"; "caring parents"; "a fond embrace"; "fond of his nephew"; "a tender glance"; "a warm embrace" [syn: affectionate, caring, lovesome, tender, warm]
2 extravagantly or foolishly loving and indulgent; "adoring grandparents"; "deceiving her preoccupied and doting husband with a young captain"; "hopelessly spoiled by a fond mother" [syn: adoring, doting]
3 absurd or silly because unlikely; "fond hopes of becoming President"; "fond fancies"
4 (followed by `of' or `to') having a strong preference or liking for; "fond of chocolate"; "partial to horror movies" [syn: fond(p), partial(p)]

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Pronunciation

Adjective

  1. affectionate
    a fond farewell
  2. to have affection for something, to have a preference for
    to be fond of children
    I am more fond of chocolate than I am lollipops.
  3. doting, indulgent, adoring
    I have fond grandparents who spoil me.
  4. outlandish
    Your fond dreams of flying to Jupiter have been quashed by the facts of reality.

Translations

affectionate
have affection for
indulgent
outlandish

Noun

  1. The background design in lace-making.

Translations

background of lace

Czech

Noun

  1. fund

Danish

Noun

fond

French

Pronunciation

Noun

fond (plural: fonds)

Related terms

Verb

fond
  1. third-person singular present tense of fondre.

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

fond
  1. fund
  2. backdrop; a theatrical scenery
  3. In the context of "lang=Swedish|"Kitchen French"": broth

Related terms

*fondera

Extensive Definition

In cooking, fond (French "base") refers to the browned and caramelized bits of meat stuck to the bottom of a skillet after cooking a piece of meat. The fond is the base of many classic pan sauces. Fonds de cuisine are the slow-simmered stocks that are basic to cooking.
After it has finished cooking, the cut of meat is removed from the pan and excess fat is poured off. Typically, aromatics such as garlic, shallots, or herbs are sautéed briefly, after which a liquid such as broth, wine, or fruit juice is used to deglaze the fond. The sauce is then reduced, and butter may be added.
Some feel that it is preferable to use traditional cookware rather than cookware with a non-stick coating when preparing a fond-based sauce. Non-stick coatings may tend to inhibit the development of the fond.

References

  • Editors of Cook's Illustrated. The New Best Recipe. Brookline, MA: America's Test Kitchen, 2004. ISBN 0-936184-74-4

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

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